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Backstage with Esile

Pronounced EH-zee-lay SAHN-yuh.

If you want my fangeeking blog, meander on over to set my frozen mind to thaw where I post and reblog things from various media. (Currently it's mostly Bioshock Infinite, Paranorman, Free! Iwatobi Swim Club, Frozen, and Arthur. It's... eclectic.)

But if you're not interested in that, this is the blog where I post historical fashion, original art, and reblog other art and animals.

I'm also the admin of Hey Arnold Fanworks.

Posts tagged fashion

Dec 17 '13
gdfalksen:

Ensemble
Ville de Paris
c.1915
Philadelphia Museum of Art

gdfalksen:

Ensemble

Ville de Paris

c.1915

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Dec 11 '13
Dec 10 '13
Dec 10 '13
Dec 10 '13
Dec 10 '13
Dec 10 '13
Dec 10 '13
Nov 26 '13

hazelxfaerie:

jaclcfrost:

allow me to introduce you to some things made by zuhair murad

aka

the guy who showed me it was indeed possible to fall in love with dresses

I need. All of these. Now.

Nov 21 '13

Edwardian Summer Undergarments

shoomlah:

chelseakenna asked you: 

Hey! I have a random question that was inspired by those drawings and you are my resident historical fashion expert (and I know NOTHING about this stuff). Were the multi-layered undergarments generally worn in cooler climates? Are there examples of alternate options from the same culture/era for trips or living in warmer areas? I cry at the thought of wearing ALL THAT STUFF in, say, here in CA in the summer. For that matter, do you know why so many layers were the preference in these cultures?

So hotter weather would generally mean thinner fabric, and less layers; women could opt for more breathable cotton undergarments:

image

…skeleton or mesh corsets:

The MetLightweight summer corset ca. 1871This skeleton-like corset is unique in form, for it is lighter and less restricting. The open spaces make it a cooler and comfortable choice for warmer weather. Most likely, this corset would be worn with casual day wear, due to its simplicity, the only detail being the lace trim at top.

image

…and/or lightweight linen/cotton dresses:

image

…All of which would somewhat relieve the stresses of layering up every morning, if not entirely. :)  Lots of activewear and travelwear from the period reflects this sort of thing- way easier to move and sweat in it without getting heat stroke.

I don’t think layers were a preference, per se, so much as they were a necessity to obtain the shaped, inhuman ideal of the period; undergarments kept you from sweating and dirtying your corset, the corset cinches you into shape, the petticoat and corset cover smooth out the lines, etc- they were all ends to a means.

If anyone else has more info on this they are more than welcome to chime in!  Lord knows I DESPISE wearing my Steampunk getup at SDCC.  So gross.

Sep 21 '13
Sep 14 '13
broadway-aradia:

neither:

Why did mens fashion have to become less homoerotic

im crying

broadway-aradia:

neither:

Why did mens fashion have to become less homoerotic

im crying

Sep 7 '13

bookoisseur:

sosuperawesome:

Jewelry by BeautySpot in Kiev, Ukraine.

Gorgeous space jewelry.

Aug 22 '13
mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress
1910-1912
The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 
Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:


I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress

1910-1912

The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 

Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:

image

I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

Aug 18 '13
mr-egbutt:

Now, this gif always annoys me, because it shows up on my dash with comments like “omg this is the sexiest thing eva” and “men in suits hhhHHH” which is fair enough.
But this gif is a very poor example of a sexily suited man. His jacket is extremely ill fitted, as if it were made for a man four sizes up from him. His tie is crooked, too tight, and mis-lengthened. His shirt’s collar is the wrong size for him, and the way he buttons it makes it look as if he’s never done it before.
Here, ladies and gents, is how it is done.

mr-egbutt:

Now, this gif always annoys me, because it shows up on my dash with comments like “omg this is the sexiest thing eva” and “men in suits hhhHHH” which is fair enough.

But this gif is a very poor example of a sexily suited man. His jacket is extremely ill fitted, as if it were made for a man four sizes up from him. His tie is crooked, too tight, and mis-lengthened. His shirt’s collar is the wrong size for him, and the way he buttons it makes it look as if he’s never done it before.

Here, ladies and gents, is how it is done.

(Source: incoherentchatter)